What Makes a Good MLM Presentation Part 1 of 3

What really makes a good MLM presentation?

This is a 3-part series in which I’ll discuss:

Part #1 (this part) – Your state of mind when you conduct an MLM presentation

Part #2 – The problem and solution approach

Part #3 – What is your offer to your prospects?

Here’s Part 1:

Not long ago, I watched Ruben Gonzalez — a 3-time Olympian in a sport that takes him down an icy mountain on a

sled at an incredible speed — who is now a motivational speaker.

He started after a short video clip of his triumph by saying:

“Many people asked me if going down an icy mountain at 85 mph is scary?

“I told them, ‘No, it’s not scary…

“It’s terrifying! It’s awful!”

As he said that with full of passion, energy and emotion, I began to wonder how many times he had said those same words that would capture anyone’s attention right from the very beginning of his talk?

5 times? 20? 100? 500?

I would reckon he had spoken those same few paragraphs at least a few hundred times. In fact, someone once told me that Madonna typically rehearse a song for at least 500 times before she performs on stage.

How is it that Ruben Gonzalez is still able to maintain his passion and energy level as he related his experience with the audience for the umpteenth time?

… Or should I put it this way:

Ruben Gonzalez is a professional motivational speaker who is able to make sure that every time he speaks – no matter whether it’s his 10th time or the 1000th time – with the same passion and energy!

And that’s expected of him, isn’t it?

After all, he’s a motivational speaker…

But, on the other hand, have you ever thought that he could in reality be sick and tired of telling the same old story over and over again no matter how exciting that story can be?

Now, think for a moment of those days when you first joined your MLM business…

You were totally excited and charged up… especially after your sponsor shared with you that you can earn a mind boggling income by simply sponsoring a few downline…

…And then you went out there and shared with your friends.

…And it was easy to sponsor a few people – I’m sure you know what I mean :-)

Your excitement, enthusiasm, eagerness, energy literally ‘electrified’ the prospect and he would be a fool not to take up your amazing offer!

Now… FAST FORWARD 3 months, 6 months, a year or two…

What happened?

You did your best to show your plan but found that your closing rate hit rock bottom.

How many times have you shared your business?

A hundred times? 200? 500?

Aren’t you like Ruben Gonzalez who’s sharing the same old plan, talking about the same old company, same old products?

It had gotten a little boring now and you just want to finish off quickly and get your prospect to sign up so
he won’t take up your precious time.

After all, this business is so simple and why did he (the prospect) not see it and kept asking so many questions?

So, before you make your next MLM presentation, take a moment to reflect on those days when you first joined and do your best to share with the same enthusiasm and then watch your success rate go back up again.

Transcending Past, Inspiring Future, Living Present

EVEN yesterday was perhaps a blight and something to be quickly forgotten. Something to be ashamed of, to feel guilty for, to be struck down with self-condemnation, if not another’s judgment – for not living up to a standard.

Such a phenomenon is likely to be experienced every now and then by us all.

We feel dirty or just like dirt. Our spirit within takes a tumble and we wonder if we will ever succeed in the slightest degree. The enemy is having a field day at our expense.

We are held inextricably to our pasts as long as we insist on remaining there.

By memory or insistence of consciousness, we go there, to where no sun shines; only pelting rain thrashes our worn exterior. Go inside to truly view the damage. The human spirit, a delicate instrument – a shimmering image of our soul – is dashed without consolation. Whether by rejection, ridicule or repeal we are strewn without hope when the sensitivities of the soul are carelessly treated.

None of us need to have been abused or neglected to feel the abovementioned burden.

It is part of the human condition – being human qualifies us for guilt, shame, condemnation, fear, judgment, and the like. We could have had the best of upbringings and we will still find it harrowing what the human experience calls us to endure. So it’s not just the abused and neglected that suffer. We all do.

***

The past is important to validate. It happened. We were not affirmed or loved as we deserved to be; none of us were. Being parents, we now empathise. It’s impossible to be a perfect parent. In my parenting I’ve failed my children countless times, simply by what I’ve said and not said.

Now here’s the rub.

Transcending our pasts is no impossibility. It is no mere possibility. It is one sure probability when we are prepared to do all we can do.

When we have proved the power of God right in being able – through trust and obedience – we know we can do anything.

A vision for the future is something we can procure simply through wondering what might be.

Such a vision is nothing short of inspiring. And to go to great pains to bring that vision to bear upon reality is our quest. There is plenty to gain and nothing to lose when we jettison time for thought on our past and cast our thoughts upon the present – what can be done now.

***

Feeling the hurt of God for how we were hurt in our past helps us believe in an inspiring vision for the future built on living in the present.

Your past does not equal your future. Your present is your key.

Our futures are always brightest when we view life through the perspective of God.

© 2015 S. J. Wickham.

How To Read Body Language Right And Negotiate Better – Negotiation Tip of the Week

When you consider how to read body language during a negotiation, what do you consider? When negotiating in person, do you focus on the other negotiator’s eyes, hands, feet, mouth? Or, are there other aspects to which you apply your attention? When negotiating on the phone and/or in social media, what do you look/listen for to gain hidden meanings to spoken/unspoken – written/unwritten words?

Being able to decipher undisclosed words and hidden meanings in a negotiation can give you great insight per what you should do to ensure you negotiate better.

Observe the following body language and nonverbal signals in your interactions with others to enhance your negotiation efforts and outcomes.

  1. Face-to-Face Negotiations:
    1. When negotiating in person, note when the other negotiator faces you straight-on with his whole body (i.e. head, feet) versus when he turns slightly away. At the point when he faces you straight-on his body language is indicating that the two of you are more aligned with what’s being discussed. Note when he turns away (i.e. head or feet). That gesture indicates that the alignment has been broken. Take special note of when that occurs in the negotiation process to heighten your mindfulness as to what was said/done to make him turn away.
    2. Eyes – Observe when the other negotiator averts his eyes from yours. You should be mindful of such even if it occurs for a moment. It may be a momentary sign of discomfort. If it occurred as the result of something he or you said, it may be a sign that he doesn’t believe what he’s saying (lying) or what he’s hearing. It could also mean, he has something in his eye. Pose a question to verify what you’ve seen if you think it will impact the negotiation.

  1. Email & Phone Negotiations:
    1. Be very observant as to when someone alters the pace of which they speak or write. In writing, such can be denoted by the variance seen in shorter or longer sentences. When speaking, such is denoted in the pace of speech. In either case, an alteration of either can indicate a shift in the negotiation.
    2. Be mindful of the tonality of your voice and that of the person with whom you’re negotiating. You can convey a more serious demeanor with a lower tonality. Such should be used when appropriate, and a softer tonality should be used when attempting to be airier and less serious. Also, be mindful of a changed tonality, that conveys the same tune. There may be deeper implications in that action.

Regardless of the environment in which you negotiate, take note of when people alter their demeanor as to why they may have done so. In order to make such a distinction, you should observe how they purport themselves in what is a ‘normal’ environment for them; doing so will give you a foundation from which to note changes. If you’re observant to such occurrences, you’ll be quicker to realize when a correction strategy may need to be employed. Such recognition will also allow you to negotiate better, which will lead to more winning negotiation outcomes… and everything will be right with the world.

Remember, you’re always negotiating!